Wai Lo

United States UConn

Funding

Commented on OREF/Current Concepts in Joint Replacement Clinical Practice Awards (CCJR Award)
I guess this is a travel award, not a research grant.

Funding

Commented on Minor Use Minor Species Development of Drugs (R01)
The FDA's Notice of Funding Opportunity, issued by its Center for Veterinary Medicine, invites grant applications for the development of new animal drugs for minor uses in major species or minor species, with grants aimed at supporting safety and effectiveness testing for FDA approval. Eligible applicants must have an Investigational New Animal Drug file with the FDA and a minor use or species designation, and the FDA's Office of New Animal Drug Evaluation must approve the study protocol before grant application submission.

Funding

Commented on Innovative Health Practices
The USAID's Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) invites diverse organizations to collaborate on innovative health interventions aimed at reducing disease and mortality rates in low-and-middle-income countries. This initiative emphasizes co-creation, co-design, and co-investment, fostering efficient, inclusive partnerships to develop and scale effective global health solutions.

Article

Commented on Macro and micro sleep architecture and cognitive performance in older adults
The authors found that older adults who have sleep patterns resembling those of younger people generally exhibit better physical and cognitive health, compared to their peers with age-typical disrupted sleep. The study, which analyzed brain activity and sleep characteristics of participants aged 54 to 96, suggests that modifying sleep patterns in older individuals could potentially improve their health.

Article

Commented on The N-glycome regulates the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition
In embryonic development, some endothelial cells lining blood vessels transform into blood-producing stem cells. Karen Hirschi and Stefania Nicoli at Yale University, and their team, studied this process in zebrafish. They found that specific sugars on the endothelial cells' surface trigger a genetic switch, turning these cells into blood stem cells. This discovery could lead to new methods for creating blood stem cells in the lab, offering potential treatments for diseases like leukemia.

Article

Commented on A single clonal lineage of transmissible cancer identified in two marine mussel species in South America and Europe
Very interesting article!!! A contagious cancer, originally found in bay mussels, has spread across oceans and species barriers, now affecting blue mussels in Europe and Chilean mussels in South America. The authors discovered that these transmissible tumours, likely spread through international shipping, originated in bay mussels and have genetically similar markers in the affected species, causing mass die-offs in these mussel populations.

Article

Commented on Three-dimensional printing of multicomponent glasses using phase-separating resins
Very interesting article to read!!! The authors here have developed a method for 3D printing intricate glass objects without needing to heat the glass to high temperatures. They created a special ink containing glass precursors and light-responsive compounds, which is solidified by light in a standard 3D printer and then processed through baking and air removal to transform from a porous material into transparent glass.

Article

Commented on Therapeutic strategies for diffuse midline glioma from high-throughput combination drug screening
Michelle Monje and her team at Stanford University discovered that a combination of panobinostat and marizomib shows promise against diffuse midline gliomas, a fatal nervous-system cancer primarily affecting children. After testing over 2,700 single compounds and more than 9,000 drug combinations on patient-derived tumor cell cultures, this combination notably increased survival in mice models of the disease.

Article

Commented on Simultaneous detection of genotype and phenotype enables rapid and accurate antibiotic susceptibility determination
A new RNA-based test developed by Deborah Hung and her team at the Broad Institute rapidly identifies antibiotic-resistant bacteria within a few hours, much faster than traditional methods. This test, which uses machine learning, detects specific RNA molecules produced by bacteria when exposed to antibiotics, distinguishing resistant strains from sensitive ones. In a trial, the test accurately identified antibiotic resistance in 71 of 72 samples of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli in less than 4 hours. This innovation could significantly improve the response to the growing issue of drug-resistant infections, which cause at least 700,000 deaths annually according to the World Health Organization.

Article

Commented on Gut-Innervating Nociceptor Neurons Regulate Peyer’s Patch Microfold Cells and SFB Levels to Mediate Salmonella Host Defense
Gut nerve cells, specifically nociceptors, are key in preventing symptoms like diarrhea and vomiting from Salmonella infections. Research by Isaac Chiu at Harvard Medical School found that mice lacking these nociceptors had significantly more Salmonella bacteria in their gut compared to normal mice. Nociceptors not only reduce the number of cells that Salmonella can infect but also help maintain beneficial gut bacteria. This discovery suggests that targeting nociceptors could lead to new treatments for infectious and inflammatory diseases.

Article

Commented on Changes in the Place of Death in the United States
The proportion of home deaths in US rose from 24% to 31%, and deaths in hospice facilities also increased. The trend favouring death outside the hospital extends to people dying of a wide variety of diseases,

Funding

Commented on Cooperative Development Program_APS
Good grant for cooperative development.

Poster

Commented on Tugboats: The Power Behind Brazil's Maritime Industry
Interesting poster.

Article

Commented on Dynll1 is essential for development and promotes endochondral bone formation by regulating intraflagellar Dynein function in primary cilia
The paper suggests that primary cilia can maintain some functionality in the absence of intact CD2 complexes and provide a viable animal model for the analysis of the underlying bone development defects of SRTDs.