Wai Lo

United States UConn

Webinar

Commented on Tapirira guianensis is Selectively Cytotoxic, Induces Apoptosis to the Glioblastoma and Decreases Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis in vivo
Seems a good talk. This study highlights the promising antitumor potential of Tapirira guianensis against glioblastoma, showing significant selective cytotoxicity, apoptosis induction, and tumor size reduction, underscoring the importance of exploring medicinal plants for novel cancer treatments.

Webinar

Commented on Desalination with black paper
Creating a filtration device that combines the unique properties of activated carbon and wood sponges offers a promising approach to developing an affordable, biodegradable system for water purification.

Webinar

Commented on WIN55,212-2 induces caspase-independent apoptosis on human glioblastoma cells by regulating HSP70, p53 and Cathepsin D
Seems fascinating! Have you published the results in a journal?

Article

Commented on Climate and Urbanization Drive Mosquito Preference for Humans
Interesting article. Their studies, involving choices between human scent and animal scent, along with genetic analysis, suggest that the attraction to human blood likely evolved once, influenced by human-made water storage serving as breeding grounds in environments lacking natural standing water.

Article

Commented on Highly Tunable Thiol‐Ene Photoresins for Volumetric Additive Manufacturing
The authors have developed a method to 3D-print objects with a wide range of material properties by projecting light into resin, overcoming the brittleness typically associated with this technique.

Article

Commented on An Optical Matter Machine: Angular Momentum Conversion by Collective Modes in Optically Bound Nanoparticle Arrays
The authors have demonstrated how nanoscale particles can be organized into orderly structures, known as optical matter, using polarized laser light, forming an array that acts as a rigid body and rotates. This innovative technique, likened to a planetary gear system, transforms light into energy at the nanoscale, opening new avenues for nanoscale mechanical work.

Article

Commented on Functional reconstitution of a bacterial CO2 concentrating mechanism in E. coli
The authors have successfully engineered Escherichia coli to grow on atmospheric levels of CO2 by incorporating a set of 20 genes for a CO2-concentrating mechanism from Halothiobacillus neapolitanus. This breakthrough allows the E. coli to subsist on CO2, offering a promising platform for exploring further CO2-concentrating genes and potentially contributing to carbon capture strategies.

Funding

Commented on Bulk Energy Storage Incentive Program
This program is important in fostering a more sustainable, efficient, and resilient energy infrastructure, aligned with broader goals of carbon reduction and environmental protection.

Funding

Commented on Integrated University Program – Scholarship and Fellowship Support
Deadline is October 2030? 6 years from now, we have plenty of time to prepare this : )

Article

Commented on Neural Basis of Cognitive Control over Movement Inhibition: Human fMRI and Primate Electrophysiology Evidence
The authors conducted a study where participants were instructed to move their eyes upon seeing a circle on a screen and then either continue or stop their eye movement based on a subsequent signal. The study found that participants could successfully stop their eye movement 75% of the time if the stop signal came 100 milliseconds after the circle appeared, but the success rate fell to 50% when the signal was delayed to 200 milliseconds. Brain activity analysis revealed that effective stopping involved coordination between the premotor cortex and two areas of the prefrontal cortex, a discovery with potential implications for understanding addictive behavior.

Article

Commented on Contemporary Hormonal Contraception and the Risk of Breast Cancer
Interesting article, they found that the risk of breast cancer was 20% higher in current and recent users of hormonal contraception than in those who had never used the drugs. Risk was lower when birth control was used for less than one year, compared with longer use.

Article

Commented on A distinct hematopoietic stem cell population for rapid multilineage engraftment in nonhuman primates
Great work from Science Translational Medicine! Briefly, the authors found that low levels of a single type of stem cell were capable of generating all blood cells and the entire immune system, and maintaining them for up to 7.5 years. They discovered that humans have a corresponding type of stem cell that expresses many of the same key genes.

Article

Commented on 20-Year Risks of Breast-Cancer Recurrence after Stopping Endocrine Therapy at 5 Years
Interesting article! The authors studied nearly 63,000 women diagnosed with breast tumors that bind estrogen. Study participants received hormonal therapy for five years to prevent recurrence of their cancer. After the hormone therapy ended, the risk of the cancer reappearing and spreading throughout the body rose at a steady rate over the next 15 years. The 20-year risk of cancer spread was 40% for women who were initially diagnosed with large tumors and cancer in their lymph nodes.

Article

Commented on Selective neuronal lapses precede human cognitive lapses following sleep deprivation
The authors studied 12 people who had had electrodes implanted into their brains. They monitored the activity of individual neurons while participants were tested on their ability to categorize images. Their results suggest that sleep deprivation impairs perception by slowing the brain cells.

Article

Commented on Human primary liver cancer–derived organoid cultures for disease modeling and drug screening
Using tissue from eight people with liver cancer, the authors have coaxed cells into forming organoids representing three common types of liver tumor. The organoids resemble bona fide liver tumors in terms of their arrangement of cells, gene expression and DNA mutations, and they metastasized when implanted beneath the skin or injected into the kidneys of lab mice.